TGC Author Rebecca McLaughlin Says We MUST Repent of our Parent’s and Grandparent’s Racism

TGC author Rebecca McLaughlin is a married woman who identifies as a lesbian and basically functions as the primary SSA spokesperson ( same-sex attracted) for The Gospel Coalition and other BigEva organizations that don’t believe these perverse attractions are sin. Dissenter explains:

Rebecca McLaughlin is a far-left social justice warrior and self-described feminist who has openly stated that she’s attracted to women and that if she weren’t a Christian, she’d likely be married to a woman. She’s also stated that homosexual attraction is not worse than heterosexual attraction. But, in 2019, McLaughlin penned an article at The Gospel Coalition insisting that “faithful” homosexuals are the most credible voices that God has raised up to speak for the Church on issues of sexual immorality.

“Likewise, when it comes to other areas of cultural engagement, we need to let our most credible voices speak,” McLaughlin writes. “In a world where Christians are seen as homophobic bigots, we need to get behind the biblically faithful, same-sex-attracted Christians God has raised up to speak for and to his church,” she added.

Worse, in 2018, McLaughlin penned an article at The Gospel Coalition urging Christians to try to find “gospel themes” in the book, 50 Shades of Grey, which is about sexual fetishes and various forms of disgusting BDSM–nothing a Christian should be laying their eyes on.

As part of the Good Faith debates hosted by TGC, she and Sean DeMars answer the question of whether or not ‘wokeness’ leads to theological compromise, with DeMars taking the affirmative position, and she taking the denial. After explaining why it’s important to define our terms, she insists that people must repent of their parent’s and grandparents’ complicity in racism, and “God help them” if they do not:

I want to propose that we do three things as we step into this conversation. First, we must define. Second, we must repent. And third, we must believe. So first we must define.

Now Shawn offered us one definition of wokeness, or perhaps various definitions of wokeness that exist on one side of a conversation. I want to start with a more original definition of wokeness, is that word was originally used…to mean being awake, aware of, alive to the history of racial injustice in this country. And I want to say when it comes to that definition, God have mercy on us if we are not woke, God have mercy on us if we are not aware of, alive to the history of racial oppression in this country.

..My second point is that we must repent. And when I say ‘we’ here, I’m speaking as a White Evangelical. The very premise of our question –is ‘woke church’ a stepping stone to theological compromise?- presumes that we are not already theologically compromised. Shawn and I both agree that we are.

But I believe that if we look at the history of our forebearers in the church, we will find a history of profound theological compromise. When it comes to questions of race, we will find a history of slavery, a history of segregation, a history of explicit racial prejudice and discrimination built into our legal systems.

And most tragically, we will find a history of white Christians who look and sound like me, being deeply complicit in this.

Now, you might say, “well, I wasn’t there. I wasn’t there when people from …the United Kingdom were transporting millions of enslaved people from Africa to America, I wasn’t there.” You might say “I wasn’t there during the period of Jim Crow laws and segregation,” You might say “I wasn’t there when thousands of black Americans were being lynched while white folk who may have been in church that morning were bringing their kids to watch black people being strung up on trees, and tortured and mutilated. “I wasn’t there.”

You might say “I wasn’t there” when a six-year-old black girl named Ruby Bridges walked into an all-white Elementary School, while hundreds of white parents shouted racial slurs at her, issued death threats against her. And while she God-bless her heart- prayed for their forgiveness because that’s what she’d been raised by her Christian parents to do, you might say “I wasn’t there”.

But you know what? Our parents were. Our grandparents, our great grandparents were. If you like me, are a White Evangelical, this is our tribe, and God have mercy on us if we do not repent.

3 thoughts on “TGC Author Rebecca McLaughlin Says We MUST Repent of our Parent’s and Grandparent’s Racism

  1. Hey fellow White Evangelical please submit to ✊🏿 🏳️‍🌈🇮🇱🇺🇦 also give me job and money me oppressed too. Thank you

  2. ‘“faithful” homosexuals are the most credible voices that God has raised up to speak for the Church on issues of sexual immorality.’

    Actually, Mrs. McLaughlin, according to the Book of Revelation chapter 14, the most credible voices that God will raise up to speak on issues of sexual immorality are the 144,000 from the tribes of Israel, who are not at the bottom of the sexual purity scale but in fact on the very top.

    You have it upside down.

  3. This idea of repenting of other people’s sins is foreign to the Bible these lunatics profess to believe. No one can repent for me and I can’t repent for them. Repentance is for yourself and you alone. It’s not that hard.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *